Change in the Upper Airway of Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Using Computational




Change in the Upper Airway of Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis: Conventional Maxillomandibular Advancement Versus Modified Maxillomandibular Advancement With Anterior Segmental Setback Osteotomy.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to compare the effect of conventional maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) and modified MMA with anterior segmental setback osteotomy (MMA-ASSO) on the airway changes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D-CFD) analysis.
METHODS:

Two adult male patients with Class I malocclusion, lip protrusion, acute nasolabial angle, and OSAS were treated with conventional MMA (Case 1) and modified MMA-ASSO (Case 2). Individualized 3D airway models were fabricated using computed tomography data obtained 1 month before (T0) and at least 6 months after surgery (T1). A total of 7 cross-sectional areas of the airway were established, starting just above the hard palate (plane 1) with interval of 1 mm caudally. Airflow velocity and negative pressure were investigated using CFD analysis, and polysomnography studies were performed at T0 and T1.
RESULTS:

There were improvement of apnea-hypoapnea index and the lowest O2 level (T0 versus T1; 43.2 versus 15.2, 79% versus 90% in Case 1; 61.0 versus 6, 89% versus 92% in Case 2). At plane 2 (retropalatal area) in Cases 1 and 2, there were increase in the smallest cross-sectional areas (57.9% versus 28.4%), decrease in the airflow velocity and increase in the negative pressure at the peak of expiration (49.5% versus 31.7%; 88.4% versus 54.3%), end after expiration (53.2% versus 32.2%; 83.2% versus 47.9%), and peak of inspiration (53.1% versus 29.2%; 75.3% versus 48.2%).
CONCLUSION:

Modified MMA-ASSO method might be an effective treatment option for OSAS patients with improvement of airway problems and esthetic facial profile.


Fonte originale: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26595001

Crediti per il testo: Kim T1, Kim HH, Hong SO, Baek SH, Kim KW, Suh SH, Choi JY.

 

 

 


 

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